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Ebbsfleet Chrism Homily 2014

“Let us recognize our need of all the gifts of God that these holy oils signify.” 


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Confirmation at St James the Great, Hanslope

Confirmation at St James the Great, Hanslope, Bucks, on Gaudete Sunday, 15 December 2013


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Christmas Message 2016


The Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ 2016

 

Yet again, the year that is ending has witnessed only a rise in the horrors of violence and its chaotic consequences.   One of our Anglican hymns for Advent cries out to God: 

 

Where is Thy reign of peace

     and purity, and love?

When shall all hatred cease,

    as in the realms above?

 

It is a prayer that will be repeated with great fervour this Christmas by refugees and displaced people, by wounded and bereaved people, by oppressed and abused and trafficked people, in cities and camps the world over, among them, unforgettably, Bethlehem itself.  The same agony seems to lie behind Pope Benedict’s Christmas prayer of 2011:  O mighty God, we love your childlike presence:  your powerlessness, your humility.  Through you love triumphs.  But we suffer from the continuing presence of violence in the world, and so we ask you:  show your power, O God.  Cause peace also to triumph in our time, in this world of ours.’

 

The agony that we feel as violence and chaos continue is simply the reverse side of the greatest good news of the season – that God has taken on our human form and raised it to glory.  The Immortal Son of God has taken on our mortal flesh, so now the face of Christ has been revealed in all human beings.  For the eyes of faith, the consequence of this fact is that no human form or face can hereafter be ignored or abused;  and whenever those same eyes do see God’s image attacked and disfigured, they will weep all the more bitterly.  Thus the strange fact is that what makes us most passionately glad and grateful at Christmas—the Christ child’s powerlessness and humility—is also what gives us the possibility of grieving as we should for the defacing of God’s image in the world.  Let us trust that it also gives the Church the vision, the courage and the strength to go on working and praying for a world where God’s image in mankind—and indeed his presence in the whole created environment—is universally honoured and protected.  Our transcendent and glorious Lord has bowed in loving respect to our fallen and failed human nature;  as Christians we can do no other than imitate such loving respect.

 

I offer my warmest good wishes for Christmas, and my prayer that Christ, who renews our

trust and hope in this celebration, will remain close to you throughout the coming year.


+ Jonathan Ebbsfleet


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